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Two PG employees at the St. Louis facility, Tania Gonzalez and Ian Peacock, recently completed Xerox’s iGen4 Operator Training. The pair joins the ranks of only 2000 operators worldwide who have become certified by Xerox in this training.

The Xerox course packs an intensive two weeks of on-site training in press set-up and specifications, equipment maintenance and color management.  Particular attention is focused on press maintenance with the goal of maintaining a 90% productivity level. Reaching this critical benchmark means the equipment is performing at optimum levels, with little or no downtime.

Xerox trainer Bob Sampson stated:  “We teach the operators the extensive diagnostic skills that they need which enable the press to function at peak performance levels. That ultimately adds a lot value when a press goes down and the operator can troubleshoot and get it up and running, in short order.”

Optimizing image quality is another important goal of the course.  The training provides the framework for understanding and managing color, and the rest  comes with time and experience.

Both Tania and Ian had previous experience with other presses in the St. Louis plant, but the Xerox technology was new for them. Ian said: “The training has been valuable in helping me run the equipment more efficiently, and it has definitely broadened my abilities in the work environment. “

Publishers’ Graphics recently installed two new Xerox 150 printers in its Carol Stream, IL headquarters, adding to its portfolio of high speed book printing equipment.   Now all three of its facilities –Carol Stream, Florence, KY and St. Louis possess similar equipment and technology.  The result has been a boost to productivity and print consistency at all three branches.

Probably the most notable enhancement of the I-Gen 150 is the “dpi” capability which increased from 300 dpi to 1200 dpi. DPI is a measurement used to describe the resolution number of dots per inch in digital print and the printing resolution of a hard copy print dot gain. The more dots per inch, the more detail, clarity, and resolution for your images. All imagery – whether black-and-white, sepia toned, or full color, benefits from this enhanced feature – think of it as High- Definition TV for your books!

Xerox I-Gen 150's enhance productivity and image resolution.

Xerox I-Gen 150’s enhance productivity and image resolution.

The best thing though might be the faster speeds of these machines.  With the ability to print 137-150 pages per minute versus 110 pages with the older machines – several hours can be shaved off the production time of the average print run. That alone reduces bottlenecks and manages production flow more efficiently throughout all the plants.

These days, quicker turnaround is definitely an expectation of customers, as is exceptional quality. With that in mind, the Xerox I-Gen’s have turned out to be the perfect “digital fit” for PG’s book printing.

For more information, visit pubgraphics.com.

(Carol Stream, IL; March 24, 2014):  Publishers’ Graphics, a global POD and offset book manufacturer with three locations nationwide, is pleased to announce two hires to support the company’s growth as a provider of global publishing solutions.

Anthony Ferrigno has joined PG as Vice President of Global Distribution and Sales.  With over 30 years of logistics experience in both domestic and global publishing, Anthony most recently served as Director of Logistics for Springer Science and Business Media for the Americas.   His responsibilities at Springer included overseeing all vendor relationships as well as the distribution of books and journals.

With extensive experience in POD management, modern warehousing, and supply chain optimization, Anthony will play a key role in the continued growth of PG in the global marketplace.  “Anthony’s experience and insight of the global publishing industry is an asset in his new role as VP of Global Distribution and Sales, “said Nick Lewis, President of Publishers’ Graphics.  He noted, “Over the years, Anthony has played a leading role in transforming Springer’s print and distribution model to a POD model.”

Also joining PG is Norma Cadena as Director of Human Resources. Norma has over 15 years of human resources experience, most recently as HR Director at Raging Waves, in Yorkville, IL.  Prior to this, she held HR management positions at multi-national corporations including Nippon Express USA and Unilever.

Norma will be based in the Carol Stream, Illinois office, and will provide HR direction and support to PG’s two other locations in St. Louis, MO, and Florence, KY.

For more information, please visit www.pubgraphics.com

 

 

Confused about paper?  Here’s our second segment of terms for first-time authors; this time we define some common paper terms you’re sure to run into when you produce a book.

Basis weight:  Basis or basic weight refers to the weight, in pounds, of a 500 sheets (ream) of paper cut to a given standard size for that particular paper grade. Common book text weights are 50#, 60#, 70#, and sometimes 80# text.

Caliper:   The measurement of the thickness of the paper.  This is listed on the online quote now.

Coated Papers:  Paper that has been coated with clay and other substances for a smooth printing surface and improved ink holdout.  Cast, gloss, dull and matte are four major categories.

Covers:  For softcover books, we offer a few standard options for book covers, C1S in two weights, 10 and 12 point.

C1S and C2S– Acronyms for Coated One Side and Coated Two Sides paper stock, used for covers for softcover books.  C1S refers to stock that is coated on one side.  We offer a 10 pt (point) and 12 pt, with a 12 pt slightly heavier and more durable.

Caliper is the measurement of the thickness of the paper.

Uncoated stocks with textured finishes must be digitally compatible.

Uncoated stocks with textured finishes must be digitally compatible.

Digital Papers: papers designed and manufactured specifically for digital presses.  They usually have a special coating that allows ink to adhere to the surface.  If you specify a paper, be sure it is digitally compatible with the particular piece of digital equipment used – such as I-gen, HP, etc…

NaturalA term to describe papers that have a color similar to that of wood, also called cream, off-white or ivory.

Opacity:  The translucency of the paper, that is, does ink show through to the other side of the sheet? The thicker the paper, the less likely it will show through.

Offset paper:  Term used for uncoated paper generally used for books.

PPI  (pounds per inch):  The method used to calculate the spine thickness.

Text:  The interior of the book, printed on a lighter weight paper.  Text can also refer to a type of paper.

Uncoated paper: Paper that has not been coated with clay.  Sometimes called offset papers.

Printing is one of those industries with a lot of terms to know!  Bleeds, trim size, full ink coverage, 4-color, 4/0, 4/4, lamination…. It goes on and on. Not to mention those elusive paper terms like text paper, cover paper, PPI, basis weight, etc…

To help out our first time authors, we put together a quick reference guide of commonly used terms in the book printing industry:

Binding : Any finishing operation following the printing including cutting, collating, folding, drilling and other finishing operations.

Bleed : Any element that extends past the edge of the printed piece.

Book Block : Folded signatures gathered, sewn and trimmed, but not yet covered.

Casewrap or case binding: A type of binding used in making hard cover books with adhesive.

Crop marks: Small printed lines around the edges of a printed piece indicating where it is to be cut out of the sheet.

4 color process : A system where a color image is separated into different color values (cyan, magenta, yellow and black or CMYK) by the use of filters and screens.
      4/0: Four process colors on one side of the sheet only.
      4/4: Four process colors on both sides of the sheet.

End Sheet: Sheets that attach to the inside pages of a case bound book to its cover. Also called end papers.

Lamination: Applying thin transparent plastic sheets to both sides of a sheet of paper, providing scuff resistance, waterproofing and extended use. Matte and gloss are available.

Perfect binding: A binding process where the signatures of a book are held together by a flexible adhesive.

Show -through: Printing on one side of the sheet that can be seen on the other side. (generally want to avoid)

Trim Size: The final size of the printed piece after it has been cut and trimmed.

We’ll cover Paper Terms in our next segment, Part II.

An offset press at our St. Louis facility.

An offset press at our St. Louis facility.

As a publisher you might be hearing a lot these days about PUR binding.  And you may also be wondering whether it makes sense for your titles.

PUR binding is one of the strongest and most durable binding methods on the market

PUR binding is one of the strongest and most durable binding methods on the market

So what exactly is PUR? Polyurethane or “PUR adhesive” glue came along in the late 1980′s and was used in other industries such as furniture and automotive before being discovered as useful in book binding applications. Its main advantage, a lower freeze point and a higher melting point, has significant advantages, especially for publishers who ship books globally.

Today PUR adhesive is gaining traction in the marketplace as publishers and consumers desire books that will keep the pages bound together more securely over the life time usage of the book.  In fact, since installing its PUR binder over three years ago, PG now uses PUR adhesion for about 40% of its books — both hardcover and softcover.

Even fans of Smythe binding, in which the signatures of the book are sewn together, are recognizing PUR’s value, and are moving over to it.  According to an article in American Printer, (October, 2003), here are just a few benefits of PUR binding:

  1. Lie-flat qualities
    When applied at its recommended thickness

    Even large page count books can be PUR bound and maintain lie-flat quality

    Even large page count books like this textbook can be PUR- bound and maintain lie-flat quality

    — 0.01 inch — PUR is considerably more flexible than standard EVA hot melts. This ability to lie flat when open allows for hands-free reading.

  2. Heat and cold resistance
    PUR adhesive has a lower freeze point and a higher melting point than any other adhesive on the market. Books bound by PUR will not fail at extreme temperatures — even over 200°F or under -40°F. These properties were especially important to customers who send books globally where temperature extremes are commonplace.
  3. Less wrinkling of backbone
    Binding cross-grained paper with standard hot melt adhesives causes considerable wrinkling in the book’s gutter area. PUR’s lower operating temperature, however, doesn’t drive paper moisture away from the backbone. PUR is also somewhat malleable as it cures, allowing the paper fibers to return to their original orientation.
  4. Less “chip-out”
    Since PUR is applied at half the standard thickness of hot melt, there is much less chance for the material to build up on trimmer knives and nick the cover material during trimming.
  5. Square backbone
    Because only a small amount of PUR needs to be used for binding, less adhesive is squeezed out when the cover station and side clinchers attach the cover and form the back.
  6. Cost savings
    One of the most significant reasons for considering PUR adhesion is the cost savings. According to a study in Europe, binders can realize a cost savings of 30 percent to 40 percent by milling off the backbone of the folded signatures and then gluing them with PUR.*

*from American Printer, October, 2003

Budgie Bird Blues and Underbelly were winners of the Crystal Award of Excellence from MPA

Budgie Bird Blues and Underbelly were winners of the Crystal Award of Excellence from MPA

Publishers’ Graphics, a leading POD, short-run and offset book manufacturer, has been honored with two Crystal Book awards from the Midwest Publishers Association (MPA) 2013 Awards Show held recently in Chicago.  Two PG customers won individual Awards of Excellence, the top honor for each category.

Winning in the Children’s Book category was Kathleen Cook with her debut book entitled Budgie Bird Blues.  Illustrated by Peter Bex, the book relates the true story of a family pet parakeet. Also winning honors was Underbelly, a gastronomical publication produced by Blind Pig of Asheville, a publisher based in North Carolina.  Underbelly won top honors in the Journals category.

The 2013 MPA publishing awards honors excellence in the planning, supervision and execution of the physical and visual aspects of publishing media. The entries are judged for general excellence in design, typography, composition, illustrations, paper, printing, special treatments, and binding.

Each award winning entry will become part of a permanent collection at the Special Collections Library of the University of Illinois at Chicago.

A leading POD, short-run and offset book manufacturer, Publishers’ Graphics brings innovative workflows and customized publishing solutions to its customers.  Headquartered in Carol Stream, Illinois, PG has manufacturing facilities in St. Louis, Missouri and Florence, Kentucky.

For more information, visit www.pubgraphics.com

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