Printing terms for First Time Authors (Part 1)

Printing is one of those industries with a lot of terms to know!  Bleeds, trim size, full ink coverage, 4-color, 4/0, 4/4, lamination…. It goes on and on. Not to mention those elusive paper terms like text paper, cover paper, PPI, basis weight, etc…

To help out our first time authors, we put together a quick reference guide of commonly used terms in the book printing industry:

Binding : Any finishing operation following the printing including cutting, collating, folding, drilling and other finishing operations.

Bleed : Any element that extends past the edge of the printed piece.

Book Block : Folded signatures gathered, sewn and trimmed, but not yet covered.

Casewrap or case binding: A type of binding used in making hard cover books with adhesive.

Crop marks: Small printed lines around the edges of a printed piece indicating where it is to be cut out of the sheet.

4 color process : A system where a color image is separated into different color values (cyan, magenta, yellow and black or CMYK) by the use of filters and screens.
      4/0: Four process colors on one side of the sheet only.
      4/4: Four process colors on both sides of the sheet.

End Sheet: Sheets that attach to the inside pages of a case bound book to its cover. Also called end papers.

Lamination: Applying thin transparent plastic sheets to both sides of a sheet of paper, providing scuff resistance, waterproofing and extended use. Matte and gloss are available.

Perfect binding: A binding process where the signatures of a book are held together by a flexible adhesive.

Show -through: Printing on one side of the sheet that can be seen on the other side. (generally want to avoid)

Trim Size: The final size of the printed piece after it has been cut and trimmed.

We’ll cover Paper Terms in our next segment, Part II.

An offset press at our St. Louis facility.

An offset press at our St. Louis facility.

1 comment
  1. Reblogged this on CKBooks Publishing and commented:
    Stuff any author should know even if they plan on publishing the traditional route. Thanks Pubgraphics!

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